Sunita Williams

importantwomensbirthdays:

Sunita Williams was born in Euclid, Ohio on September 19, 1965. Williams trained at the Naval Test Pilot School and earned a masters in engineering management from Florida Institute of Technology. In 1998, Williams was selected by NASA to become an astronaut, and has since spent 322 days in outer space. Over the course of her career, she has served as a Flight Engineer and Space Station Commander. Williams has won a Navy Commendation Medal and many other awards.

Happy birthday, Sunita Williams!

María de la Cruz

importantwomensbirthdays:

Writer and activist María de la Cruz was born on September 18, 1912 in Chimbarongo, Chile. Through her work in print journalism and radio, de la Cruz advocated for women’s suffrage. In 1946, she founded the Feminine Party of Chile and in 1953, she became the first female senator in Chile.

María de la Cruz died in 1995, at the age of 83.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Chilean women vote in a municipal election, 1945.
Chilean granted women the right to vote in municipal elections in 1931.  Chilean women achieved full suffrage in 1949.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Chilean women vote in a municipal election, 1945.

Chilean granted women the right to vote in municipal elections in 1931.  Chilean women achieved full suffrage in 1949.

52 Powerful Women-Photography

There are plenty of amazing female photographers in the world, but today let’s focus on Margaret Bourke White. 

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Bourke-White started her career in 1927 as an industrial & architectural photographer for the Otis Steel Company. She would later go on to work for both Fortune magazine and be hired as the first female photojournalist for the new Life magazine. 

In 1936, Bourke-White’s photograph of the construction of the Fort Peck Dam appeared on the cover of the very first issue of Life. What a way to kick off what would become an iconic publication. 

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As impressive as Bourke-White’s early work is, it is not the work that she is recognized for. Not only was she the first foreign photographer permitted within the Soviet Union-not the first female photographer, but the first photographer-, but Bourke-White was also the first female war correspondent. 

Let’s take a moment to understand the extent of her work: 

-She started the first photography lab at Life

-She recorded how Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia under the Nazi regime…

-as well as how the Russian people were doing under Communism

-She was in Moscow when the German forces invaded

-She journeyed through North Africa with the U.S Air Force…

-then through Italy, where she repeatedly came under fire…

-then through Germany where she traveled with Gen. Patton

-She went to the Buchenwald concentration camp and captured photographs that showed the world the extent of the camp’s horrors

-She photographed Gandhi hours before his death

-She was in India in time to capture the violence that erupted over the country’s independence

-She went through Korea with South Korean troops

Aside from her work over seas, Bourke-White also kept plenty busy on the home front. She worked throughout the mid-1930’s photographing victims of the Dust Bowl. You may recognize one of her more famous photos here:

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Bourke-White’s work expresses her compassionate and humanitarian approach to her subject matter. Whether she was photographing Depression-era flood victims or the atrocities of war, Bourke-White did so in a way that encouraged her audience to look beyond the violence and see the true subjects of her work; the people. Her work has had a lasting influence on the photography world.

I’m not gonna lie, I am having a ton of fun with this little project of mine. Special thanks to Distractify  for giving me the opportunity to share these powerful photos of women who changed the world. There are other female photographers out there that I would love to cover in a future post. Feel free to share any suggestions you may have!

margaret bourke white photography life magazine photojournalism Women's History Wednesday turningpoints

fuckyeahfeminists:

Congrats to Tracey Lewis, who will be the 2nd Black woman in FDNY’s history to be promoted to lieutenant - the first in 12 years! Here’s hoping there will be many more. There needs to be more gender and racial diversity in FDNY’s ranks.

I was going to share this for next week’s Readings, but the news is too great.

fuckyeahfeminists:

Congrats to Tracey Lewis, who will be the 2nd Black woman in FDNY’s history to be promoted to lieutenant - the first in 12 years! Here’s hoping there will be many more. There needs to be more gender and racial diversity in FDNY’s ranks.

I was going to share this for next week’s Readings, but the news is too great.

Tracey Lewis women making history turningpoints

Dorothy Loudon

importantwomensbirthdays:

Dorothy Loudon was born on September 17, 1925 in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1962, Loudon made her first Broadway appearance in Nowhere to Go But Up, a role for which she received the Theatre World Award. Loudon received her first Tony nomination for her performance in The Fig Leaves Are Falling, but it was her role as Ms. Hannigan in

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Sept. 17, 1849: Harriet Tubman Attempts to Escape From Slavery
On this day in 1849, American abolitionist Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery. She escaped alongside her brothers, Ben and Henry, who forced her to turn back with them after they had second thoughts.
Tubman ran away again shortly afterward without her brothers, this time successfully, using the Underground Railroad as her escape route to the North.
The Underground Railroad was a lifeline for slaves escaping to freedom, and Harriet Tubman became undoubtedly one of its most famous “conductors.”
PBS Black Culture Connection invites you to learn 10 interesting facts about Harriet Tubman.
Photo: Harriet Tubman, full-length portrait, standing with hands on back of a chair between ca. 1860 and 1875 (Library of Congress)

PBS is such a wonderful source of information.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Sept. 17, 1849: Harriet Tubman Attempts to Escape From Slavery

On this day in 1849, American abolitionist Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery. She escaped alongside her brothers, Ben and Henry, who forced her to turn back with them after they had second thoughts.

Tubman ran away again shortly afterward without her brothers, this time successfully, using the Underground Railroad as her escape route to the North.

The Underground Railroad was a lifeline for slaves escaping to freedom, and Harriet Tubman became undoubtedly one of its most famous “conductors.”

PBS Black Culture Connection invites you to learn 10 interesting facts about Harriet Tubman.

Photo: Harriet Tubman, full-length portrait, standing with hands on back of a chair between ca. 1860 and 1875 (Library of Congress)

PBS is such a wonderful source of information.

(Source: pbs.org)

Readings on Turning Points II-History In Pink: 17 Year Old's Mission To Unite A New Generation Of Female Leaders

This was meant to be shared with today’s readings. Mary Dwyer has created a website dedicated to American women’s history. She hopes we can recognize and celebrate women’s contributions to our nation. Here’s a link for her site: “History in Pink”.

mary dwyer history in pink women turningpoints